One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station  For the first time,…

One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station 

For the first time, researchers have identified a genetic marker associated with a spaceflight medical issue. It is in the enzymes associated with the “1 carbon pathway.”

By: Science At NASA.

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One Carbon Metabolism on the Space Station  For the first time,…

The Mesmerizing Universe: X-Ray Vision for the Stars NASA has…

The Mesmerizing Universe: X-Ray Vision for the Stars 

NASA has begun a series of studies of four concepts that will in a few years’ time produce candidate designs for a major space observatory to begin construction later next decade. One of these is the X-Ray Surveyor.

The X-Ray Surveyor mission will probe some of the most explosive and high-energy objects in our Universe, and will provide insight into the seeds of Black Holes, the formation and evolution of galaxies and clusters of galaxies and even of the stars themselves.

Please join our regular hosts, Tony Darnell, Alberto Conti, and Harley Thronson, as they discuss with Dr. Alexey Vikhlinin from the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Dr. Laura Lopez from Ohio State, Dr. Steve Allen from Stanford and Dr. Jessica Gaskin from NASA Marshall Space Flight Center the science that will be revealed by a telescope observing X-Rays emanating from our Universe.

By: Deep Astronomy.

The Mesmerizing Universe: X-Ray Vision for the Stars NASA has…

ISS Crewmember Reflects on the Science Accomplished Aboard the…

ISS Crewmember Reflects on the Science Accomplished Aboard the Station 

Aboard the International Space Station, Expedition 47 Flight Engineer Tim Peake of the European Space Agency discussed life and research on the orbital outpost during an in-flight interview on May 17 with the Federation Aeronautique Internationale gathered in Leicester, England. The space station passed a milestone on May 16, crossing the Equator at 2:10 a.m. EDT to begin the 100,000th orbit of its lifetime since its first component was launched on Nov. 20, 1998. Peake and station Commander Tim Kopra of NASA are scheduled to return to Earth aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft on June 18 to complete a six-month mission.

By: NASA.

ISS Crewmember Reflects on the Science Accomplished Aboard the…

Cleaning Up Outer Space  This episode of the Smithsonian…

Cleaning Up Outer Space 

This episode of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum’s “What’s New in Aerospace?” series featured host Martin Collins, space history curator at the museum, and historian Lisa Ruth Rand discussing past and current orbital debris research, some American and international efforts to reduce debris, the latest proposed methods to clean up orbit — from lasers to space nets — and thoughts about how we might best solve the problem of trash in space. The “What’s New in Aerospace?” series is presented in collaboration with NASA.

By: NASA.

Cleaning Up Outer Space  This episode of the Smithsonian…

NASA Tracks Volcanic Ash With Satellites  Volcano eruptions can…

NASA Tracks Volcanic Ash With Satellites 

Volcano eruptions can wreak havoc on airplanes that fly through the clouds of ash and sulfur dioxide. The ash, in particular, can destroy a jet engine and even cause it to fail mid-flight. However, it can be difficult to detect the ash clouds, because they often look like ordinary rain clouds on radar and to the pilot’s eye. To be cautious, volcanic eruptions are given a wide bearth, leading to costly delays and cancellations.

NASA scientist Nickolay Krotkov is developing a new way to map the full three-dimensional structure of the volcanic cloud. The NASA/NOAA/DoD Suomi NPP satellite maps the concentration of sulfur dioxide and volcanic aerosols using the Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS). After it passes the volcanic plume, the OMPS Limb Profiler looks backwards and measures the vertical profile of the cloud in three separate slices.

The location and height of the particles, as well as the amount of sulfur dioxide, is being integrated into models of weather patterns to forecast the spread of the volcanic cloud. Thigh resolution of the vertical profiles allows a more accurate forecast in the days, weeks, and months after an eruption, which could reduce airline cancellations and re-routing costs.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=12221

By: NASA Goddard.

NASA Tracks Volcanic Ash With Satellites  Volcano eruptions can…

Satellites Are Helping To Feed Tired And Hungry Birds This…

Satellites Are Helping To Feed Tired And Hungry Birds 

This spring, migrating shorebirds came across roughly 7000 acres of temporary wetland habitat to feed on during their stopover in California’s Central Valley.

The BirdReturns program, created by The Nature Conservancy of California, is an effort to provide “pop-up habitats” for some of the millions of shorebirds, such as sandpipers and plovers that migrate along the Pacific Flyway, a route that spans from Alaska to South America. Birds flying on this journey seek out the increasingly rare wetlands teeming with tasty insects to fuel their long-distance flights.

Over the last century, California’s Central Valley has lost 95% of the wetlands habitat to development, agriculture, and other land use changes. As a solution, scientists use big data, binoculars, and rice paddies.

The Nature Conservancy works closely with two other organizations, who are using NASA data to enable the program. Point Blue Conservation Science is using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat satellite to map surface water in the Central Valley and determine the likelihood a given spot will have water any given month. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is using data from Landsat and NASA’s MODIS instrument to expand their network of citizen science observations. With the NASA data, the Cornell Lab is able to take individual bird observations and predict how abundant a given bird species will be at any location.

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=12013

By: NASA Goddard.

Satellites Are Helping To Feed Tired And Hungry Birds This…

Monsoons: Wet, Dry, Repeat…  The monsoon is a seasonal rain and…

Monsoons: Wet, Dry, Repeat… 

The monsoon is a seasonal rain and wind pattern that occurs over South Asia (among other places). Through NASA satellites and models we can see the monsoon patterns like never before. Monsoon rains provide important reservoirs of water that sustain human activities like agriculture and supports the natural environment through replenishment of aquifers. However, too much rainfall routinely causes disasters in the region, including flooding of the major rivers and landslides in areas of steep topography. This visualization uses a combination of NASA satellite data and models to show how and why the monsoon develops over this region. In the summer the land gets hotter, heating the atmosphere and pulling in cooler, moisture-laden air from the oceans. This causes pulses in heavy rainfall throughout the region. In the winter the land cools off and winds move towards the warmer ocean and suppressing rainfall on land.

By: NASA Goddard.

Monsoons: Wet, Dry, Repeat…  The monsoon is a seasonal rain and…