After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History, This River Is…

After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History, This River Is Thriving 

Conservationists can now point to the largest dam removal project in the U.S. as a success story. The ecosystem of Washington’s Elwha River has been thriving since the removal of its hydroelectric dam system. Recent surveys show dramatic recovery, especially in the near shore at the river’s mouth, where the flow of sediment has created favorable habitat for the salmon population. A new generation of salmon species, some of which are endangered, are now present in the river. Some hope that the restoration of the Elwha River will become a shining example for the removal of dams across the U.S.

By: National Geographic.
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After Largest Dam Removal in U.S. History, This River Is…

TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block How well…

TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block 

How well do you know your neighbors? If you live in an urban area of North America, you might have a furry neighbor that you haven’t yet seen. Raccoons have adapted so well to city life, they are now more common in cities than in the country.

John Hadidian, wildlife scientist at the Humane Society and a National Geographic grantee, explains that raccoons’ intelligence, omnivorous diet, and manual dexterity make them masters of adaptation. These clever creatures even use our sewer systems as their own commuter highways. So the next time you see one of these little guys digging in your trash or climbing on your roof, take a moment to appreciate its street smarts.

Learn more about raccoons: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/raccoon/

By: National Geographic.
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TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block How well…

One Man’s Mission to Revive the Last Redwood Forests David…

One Man’s Mission to Revive the Last Redwood Forests 

David Milarch’s near-death experience inspired a personal quest: to archive the genetics of the world’s largest trees before they’re gone. This short film from The Story Group documents his effort to save the redwood champions of Northern California from the effects of climate change.

By: National Geographic.
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One Man’s Mission to Revive the Last Redwood Forests David…

Mastodon Bones’ Discovery May Hold Clues About First…

Mastodon Bones’ Discovery May Hold Clues About First Americans 

Prehistoric mastodon bones and a stone knife found in Florida’s Aucilla River provide further evidence of early humans in the Americas. The findings, radiocarbon dated to around 14,550 years ago, puts humans in the southeast U.S. about 1500 years earlier than previously thought.

Read more about the discovery: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/05/160513-first-americans-clovis-mastodon-florida-page-ladson/

By: National Geographic.
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Mastodon Bones’ Discovery May Hold Clues About First…