What if I still don’t think I’m sick enough? Some…

What if I still don’t think I’m sick enough? 

Some professionals are just bad at their jobs. That’s the truth. So we may have to shout to get the help that we need or possibly get another opinion from another mental health professional.

One of the questions I received like this is below:

Could you do a video on not feeling sick enough or doubting you have a mental illness at all even when you’ve been diagnosed with one? I feel I have this problem of having minor problems with everything (some eating issues, never diagnosed as they are not bad enough, really minor self harm), but am seriously not sick enough with anything and therefore not worthy of help. I’ve had a lot of invalidating comments and judged as “not sick enough” and turned down when asking for help from professionals too. I’m afraid I don’t have depression, I just have a bad self esteem, because I really am good at nothing, lazy and a bad person. Basically that I don’t have real depression or it’s really minor and therefore everything I thought was the “voice of depression” is actually true. I don’t feel like my past was bad enough to warrant PTSD diagnoses. That no matter how bad I feel those feelings just aren’t and can’t be bad enough to be valid and real. Any help much appreciated!

By: Kati Morton.
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What if I still don’t think I’m sick enough? Some…

How Neurononsense Keeps Women in Their PlaceHave new brain…

How Neurononsense Keeps Women in Their Place

Have new brain imaging techniques really revealed that women and men are ‘hardwired’ for their gender roles? Or has neuroscience become misappropriated to justify gender gaps? Professor of cognitive neuroimaging Gina Rippon investigates.

There is a long history of debate about biological sex differences and their part in determining gender roles, with the ‘biology is destiny’ mantra being used to legitimise imbalances in these roles. The tradition is continuing, with new brain imaging techniques being hailed as sources of evidence of the ‘essential’ differences between men and women, and the concept of ‘hardwiring’ sneaking into popular parlance as a brain-based explanation for all kinds of gender gaps.

But the field is littered with many problems. Some are the product of ill-informed popular science writing (neurotrash) based on the misunderstanding or misrepresentation of what brain imaging can tell us. Some, unfortunately involve poor science, with scientists using outdated and disproved stereotypes to design and interpret their research (neurosexism). These problems obscure or ignore the ‘neuronews’, the breakthroughs in our understanding of how plastic and permeable our brains are, and how the concept of ‘hard-wiring’ should be condemned to the dustbin of neurohistory.

This talk aims to offer ways of rooting out the neurotrash, stamping out the neurosexism and making way for neuronews.

Gina Rippon is Professor of Cognitive Neuroimaging at Aston University. Her research involves the application of brain imaging techniques, particularly electroencephalography, (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG), to studies of normal and abnormal cognitive processes.

Q&A – How Neurononsense Keeps Women in Their Place

What does neuroscience have to say about transgender issues? Do the things we’re told about how boys and girls learn dictate how they really do learn? What role does differences in hormones in males and females have? Gina Rippon answers questions from the audience following her talk.

By: The Royal Institution

How Neurononsense Keeps Women in Their PlaceHave new brain…

How Do Things Hide In Plain Sight?  Did you see that?…

How Do Things Hide In Plain Sight? 

Did you see that? …No? With so much going on around us, our brain sometimes misses the details – here’s why.

Read More:

By: DNews.

How Do Things Hide In Plain Sight?  Did you see that?…

Get the Facts on Asexuality and Aromance  The term “asexual” has…

Get the Facts on Asexuality and Aromance 

The term “asexual” has slowly but surely become a more well-known subject. However even with this boost in knowledge about this seemingly new class of sexual identity there is still a lot that needs to be learned.

Articles referenced:

By: Psych2Go.

Get the Facts on Asexuality and Aromance  The term “asexual” has…