Cleaning Poop from Drinking Water | Engineering Is Here in the…

Cleaning Poop from Drinking Water | Engineering Is

Here in the US, we take clean drinking water for granted. In many parts of the world, however, modern water treatment simply doesn’t exist. This creates a major problem – poop in the drinking water! Amy Pickering, a Stanford engineer, went to Dhaka, Bangladesh to observe how the residents collected water. The challenge? Build a simple, cheap device so that residents can easily collect clean drinking water.

By: QUEST Science.
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Cleaning Poop from Drinking Water | Engineering Is Here in the…

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes Manu Prakash and…

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes

Manu Prakash and his lab at Stanford University have designed an origami based paper microscope, called a Foldscope. The microscope is printed on waterproof paper. The user punches out the pieces and folds them together to create a fully functional microscope. It works with standard microscope slides and requires no external power to operate. You simply hold the Foldscope up to a light source (like the sun) and look through the salt grain-sized lens to view the sample on the slide. The high curvature of the tiny lenses used in the Foldscope allows small objects to be highly magnified. This little invention costs less than a dollar to produce and could have major implications for global health and for science education.

By: QUEST Science.
Donate to KQED

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes Manu Prakash and…

Microscopes for the Masses Manu Prakash, a bioengineer at…

Microscopes for the Masses

Manu Prakash, a bioengineer at Stanford University, is sending 50,000 microscopes to children and life-long learners throughout the world. The microscopes are made out of waterproof paper, folded and assembled by the end user and cost less than $1 to produce. They are currently in clinical trials to be approved as tools to diagnose diseases like malaria and African sleeping sickness. Prakash calls them Foldscopes, and they were born out of a desire to make scientific tools accessible to all, particularly people and healthcare workers living in developing countries or remote areas.

By: QUEST Science.
Donate to KQED: https://www.kqed.org/donate/gateway.jsp

Microscopes for the Masses Manu Prakash, a bioengineer at…

Career Spotlight: Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Graduate…

Career Spotlight: Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Graduate Student

Elijah Martin is a second year graduate student in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology program at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He works in the laboratory of Dr. Deepak Srivastava at the Gladstone Institutes where he studies how the heart forms to try to understand causes of heart disease in order to develop therapies. In the lab, Martin grows heart cells in petri dishes, which involves mixing together different chemicals and nutrients to get the cells to grow and develop into a heart. He also uses microscopes to track the growth of the cells. Since he was a young child he has wanted to study the heart, and going to graduate school can help turn his dream into a career.

By: QUEST Science.
Donate to KQED: https://www.kqed.org/donate/gateway.jsp

Career Spotlight: Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Graduate…

Reawakening Extinct Species Using new genetic technologies,…

http://video.pbs.org/viralplayer/2365223185

Reawakening Extinct Species

Using new genetic technologies, scientists are trying to bring back extinct species. Meet researchers working to revive the passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, and the woolly mammoth, which they say could slow down the melting of Arctic permafrost. It may be possible, but is it right to turn back the clock?

By: QUEST.
Donate to KQED: https://www.kqed.org/donate/gateway.jsp

via sciencefriday:

Just because we’re developing the tools to de-extinct a species, does that mean we should. This video from kqedscience explores the idea, while ancient DNA expert Beth Shapiro explains to Ira that it might not be all that wise.

Reawakening Extinct Species Using new genetic technologies,…

Bending Light with a New Kind of Microscope | Science…

Bending Light with a New Kind of Microscope | Science Spotlight

Manu Prakash, a bioengineer at Stanford University, has created a fully functional microscope out of waterproof paper that uses teeny tiny lenses to magnify objects. He calls it a Foldscope. The different parts of the microscope are printed on paper, which the user punches out and folds together. The Foldscope requires no power outlets and works with standard microscope slides. The Foldscope operates a lot like a traditional microscope in that it uses lenses to bend light in order to make tiny images appear larger.

By: QUEST Science.

Bending Light with a New Kind of Microscope | Science…

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes | Engineering…

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes | Engineering Is

Manu Prakash and his lab at Stanford University have designed an origami based paper microscope, called a Foldscope. The microscope is printed on waterproof paper. The user punches out the pieces and folds them together to create a fully functional microscope. It works with standard microscope slides and requires no batteries or electricity to operate. You simply hold the Foldscope up to a light source (like the sun) and look through the salt grain-sized lens to view the sample on the slide. The high curvature of the tiny lenses used in the Foldscope allows small objects to be highly magnified. This little invention costs less than a dollar to produce and could have major implications for global health and for science education.

Read the full article at: http://science.kqed.org/quest/video/diagnosing-diseases-with-origami-microscopes-engineering-is/

By: QUEST Science.

Diagnosing Diseases with Origami Microscopes | Engineering…