The MAGNETO SNAIL! (and other marine gastropods)  In 2015, a new…

The MAGNETO SNAIL! (and other marine gastropods) 

In 2015, a new species of deep-sea snail was described that blew our minds: the the scaly-foot gastropod (Crysomallon squamiferum), aka basically the Magneto Snail. Living in hydrothermal ecosystems is a tough life, so this snail had evolved with a shell literally made out of iron – some populations’ shells are even magnetic. Food sources are scarce down there but these snails don’t eat – they get all of their energy through a process of chemosynthesis, in which the bacteria living in their guts produce the nutrients required for sustained life.

The more I looked into the fascinating world of marine snails, I realized I knew virtually nothing about these invertebrates. They’ve dominated every part of the ocean, from the banks to the floor, inhabiting niches that allow them to diversify in incredible ways.

So, here’s a quick overview of some of the 4.5 million snails in the Field’s collection! Stay tuned to hear Jochen play a giant conch shell at the end. It’s worth it.

By: The Brainscoop.

The MAGNETO SNAIL! (and other marine gastropods)  In 2015, a new…

Tiny tapir explores his home, bobcat kittens go mew & cougar…

Tiny tapir explores his home, bobcat kittens go mew & cougar family playtime 

Biologists make an adorable discovery in the Santa Monica mountains, a tiny striped tapir calf dashes around his outside enclosure at Edinburgh Zoo, a mountain lion family enjoys some downtime, and a cuddle-loving rescue bat named Jeddah.

Standby for your fix of adorable animal antics in this episode of The Cute News!

By: Earth Touch.

Tiny tapir explores his home, bobcat kittens go mew & cougar…

Testing 5 Extraordinary Animals – Extraordinary Animals Here at…

Testing 5 Extraordinary Animals – Extraordinary Animals 

Here at Earth Unplugged we enjoyed the program Extraordinary Animals so much we thought it would be interesting to show you guys some highlights. In this video five smart animals are tested on their abilities.

By: Earth Unplugged.

Testing 5 Extraordinary Animals – Extraordinary Animals Here at…

Deepwater Exploration of Glacier Bay National Park: March 17 -…

Deepwater Exploration of Glacier Bay National Park: March 17 – 30, 2016 

From March 17-30, a University of Maine-led team conducted the first-ever deep-water exploration of Glacier Bay National Park using both diver-based surveys and a remotely operated vehicle.

During the expedition, scientists found an abundance of cold-water corals and associated organisms that use these corals as habitat, from the very bottom to the top of the submerged portion of the fjords. Prior to this exploration, little was known about ecosystems in the depths of the fjord and records of corals were sparse. This video features highlights from the expedition.

Learn more about findings from the expedition: http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/about/what-we-do/oer-updates/2016/gbnp-expedition-041816.html

By: Ocean Explorer.

Deepwater Exploration of Glacier Bay National Park: March 17 -…

Inside the World of Fire Ants!  If you LOVE fire ants, you’re…

Inside the World of Fire Ants! 

If you LOVE fire ants, you’re gonna love this week’s episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart. I dive deep into a fire ant colony to learn about their amazing biology and retrace the history of their North American invasion.

If you HATE fire ants, you’re gonna love this video too, because it also features parasitic flies that want to eat their brains! It’s a win-win!

By: It’s Okay To Be Smart.
Get It’s Okay to be Smart merchandise at DFTBA

Inside the World of Fire Ants!  If you LOVE fire ants, you’re…

TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block How well…

TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block 

How well do you know your neighbors? If you live in an urban area of North America, you might have a furry neighbor that you haven’t yet seen. Raccoons have adapted so well to city life, they are now more common in cities than in the country.

John Hadidian, wildlife scientist at the Humane Society and a National Geographic grantee, explains that raccoons’ intelligence, omnivorous diet, and manual dexterity make them masters of adaptation. These clever creatures even use our sewer systems as their own commuter highways. So the next time you see one of these little guys digging in your trash or climbing on your roof, take a moment to appreciate its street smarts.

Learn more about raccoons: http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/raccoon/

By: National Geographic.
Donate to the National Geographic Society

TIL: There’s Probably a Raccoon Living On Your Block How well…