Francisco Franco: Dictator of Spain (Tom Richey Tonight) TOM…

Francisco Franco: Dictator of Spain (Tom Richey Tonight) 

TOM RICHEY TONIGHT is a new format I’m trying where I interview scholars about topics that interest me that I know very little about.

I had the pleasure of sitting down with Dr. Enrique Sanabria to discuss the career and legacy of General Francisco Franco. Dr. Sanabria is an Associate Professor of History at the University of New Mexico who specializes in Modern Spain. In our conversation, we discussed the Spanish Civil War, Franco’s relationship with Fascist parties, the conservative nature of Franco’s dictatorship and how it changed over time during the Cold War.

In discussing General Franco, Dr. Sanabria highlights the concept of two Spains: a liberal, progressive Spain and a conservative, Catholic Spain. Spain continues to grapple with the controversial legacy of a man who is still remembered fondly by some in the conservative, Catholic camp and reviled by those in the liberal, progressive camp.

This interview will be beneficial for teachers and students of European History who would like to learn about a topic that tends to lurk in the background of the narrative of twentieth century dictatorships and the World War II era.

By: Tom Richey.

Advertisements
Francisco Franco: Dictator of Spain (Tom Richey Tonight) TOM…

The First Two Party System  Tom Richey explains the dynamics of…

The First Two Party System 

Tom Richey explains the dynamics of the first two party system that materialized in the United States in the 1790s, starting with the debates between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton in Washington’s cabinet and escalating into the partisan elections of 1796 and 1800. In 1796, John Adams defeated Thomas Jefferson in a close race. The Jeffersonian Republican opposition was so fierce that the Federalist Congress passed the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798, making it a criminal offense to criticize the government. Thomas Jefferson and James Madison responded with the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions, which condemned the Alien and Sedition Acts as unconstitutional. In 1800, Thomas Jefferson defeated John Adams in another close election that Jefferson dubbed the “Revolution of 1800.”

By: Tom Richey.

The First Two Party System  Tom Richey explains the dynamics of…

The Articles and the Constitution  The Articles of Confederation…

The Articles and the Constitution 

The Articles of Confederation were drawn up during the American Revolution creating a glorified military alliance with a weak central government in order to minimize the chances of tyranny. After the Revolution, a bad economy and Shays’ Rebellion caused many elites to reconsider and advocate for a stronger central government. In 1787, the Constitutional Convention met in Philadelphia to create the United States Constitution, which created a stronger central government with additional power, such as the power to regulate interstate commerce. The Constitution was ratified after a contentious process which ended with the addition of a Bill of Rights to appease the Antifederalists. In the state of New York, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay wrote The Federalist Papers in order to answer objections to the proposed Constitution.

By: Tom Richey.

The Articles and the Constitution  The Articles of Confederation…

English Traditions of Government  I discuss the legacy of…

English Traditions of Government 

I discuss the legacy of English traditions of government that influenced institutions of government in Colonial America and subsequently the United States. Topics included are the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and John Locke’s theories of government.

By: Tom Richey.

English Traditions of Government  I discuss the legacy of…

The Declaration of Independence  The Declaration of Independence…

The Declaration of Independence 

The Declaration of Independence was signed fifteen months after the Battles of Lexington and Concord. It took many colonists over a year to come around to believing that revolution was inevitable and that it was no use trying to reason any further with Parliament or the British Crown. The Declaration of Independence employs the ideas of John Locke, appealing to natural law and chronicling the “long train of abuses” that Jefferson lays at the feet of George III. After formally declaring independence, the United States were together able to make a full commitment to the American Revolution and were able to able to appeal to France and other nations for military and economic assistance.

The Declaration of Independence has become one of the most influential documents in history, with its language being employed in the Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Seneca Falls Declaration, and the Vietnamese Declaration of Independence.

By: Tom Richey.

The Declaration of Independence  The Declaration of Independence…

The Ego and the Western Tradition (Tea Talks – #1) Why is it…

The Ego and the Western Tradition (Tea Talks – #1)

Why is it that when people say that someone has a big ego that it is typically considered to be a bad thing?

I’m starting a new series called Tea Talks. These Tea Talks will be informal lectures without any notes or visual aids – just me talking about a topic related to history, philosophy, or current events. In the first of my Tea Talks, I discuss the Ego and the Western Tradition and the role that the classical and Christian traditions have had in shaping the our perception of ego.

By: Tom Richey.

The Ego and the Western Tradition (Tea Talks – #1) Why is it…